American Bulldog: Characteristics, Origin, Temperament & Lifespan

The American Bulldog is a large breed of utility dog. It is now used on animal farms, dog sports and also for showing. It is known by some other names such as Country Bulldog, English White Bulldog, Hill Bulldog, Southern White, White English and Old Southern White Bulldog.

The American Bulldog breed descended from the now-extinct Old English Bulldog. These animals are part of American culture and history. And they may be used as a cultural icon for the United States.

The Old English Bulldog was preserved by working class immigrants who brought their working dogs with them to the American South. These dogs are believed to have first appeared as early as the 17th Century.

Small farmers and ranchers used this all-around working dog for many tasks including farm guardians, stock dogs and catch dogs. These dogs were not an actual breed as considered by today’s standards and neither were most other dogs.

Kennel clubs of any kind did not yet exist and should not until 1875, at least two centuries after the Old English Bulldog first migrated to America.

The Old English Bulldog had many different strains for cattle droving, bull baiting, farm dogs and butcher’s dogs in the 17th and 18th century. Bull baiting was also a common blood sport of the era and though there is evidence of such migrating to America with the landrace bulldogs brought by working class Englishmen in colonial times.

It is also certain that the strains that migrated to America were unaffected by the banning of the sport in 1835 in the U.K. and therefore, there was no need for a decline in the population of the old-type bulldog.

See also  Boston Terrier Dog: Characteristics, Origin, Temperament & Lifespan

The American Bulldogs are generally represented as being strong and tough. This breed was added to the American Kennel Club (AKC) Foundation Stock Service in November 2019.[1]

American Bulldog Characteristics

The American Bulldog is a stocky, well built and strong looking dog, with a large head and muscular build. Especially, the shoulders and chest tend to be most muscular parts of the American Bulldog.

Coat of the American Bulldog is short and generally smooth. The breed is a light to moderate shedder. Colors, while historically predominantly white with patches of red, black, or brindle, have grown in recent years to include many color patterns including black, red, brown, fawn, and all shades of brindle.

The color conformation is quite varied, but solid black or any degree of merle is considered a cosmetic fault, and a blue color is a disqualification by the National Kennel Club Breed Standard.

Black pigmentation on the nose and eye rims is traditionally preferred, with only some pink allowed. Eye color is usually brown, but heterochromia also occurs, although this is also considered a cosmetic fault.

The American Bulldogs are known to drool more than other breeds of dog. The Bully type is generally a larger, heavier dog with a shorter muzzle, but the muzzle should never be so short that it causes difficulty with breathing. Standard types are generally more athletic with longer muzzles and a more square head.

Many modern American Bulldogs are a combination of the two types, usually termed “hybrid.” Average height of the mature American Bulldogs is between 20 and 28 inches at the withers. And average live body weight of the mature dog is between 27 and 54 kg.

See also  Brava Cattle Farming: Business Starting Plan For Beginners
american bulldog, american bulldogs, about american bulldog, american bulldog appearance, american bulldog breed, american bulldog breed information, american bulldog caring, american bulldog coat color, american bulldog characteristics, american bulldog color varieties, american bulldog facts, american bulldog feeding, american bulldog temperament, american bulldog lifespan, american bulldog health, american bulldog as pets

Temperament

The American Bulldogs are generally confident, social, ebullient and lively dogs that are at ease with their families. They generally bond strongly with their owners, and are happiest when their masters can shower them with time and attention. Although, they are not as friendly with people they don’t know.

The American Bulldogs mature later than many other dog breeds, not until the age of two years. The puppies are curious, yet aloof with strangers, but confident at maturity.

The American Bulldogs should never be left alone, bored, in a house day after day. As they may become more fearful and aggressive towards things they do not know or understand.

This is a large breed that must not become a frog in a well that only knows its home territory and it must be trained out of the dog immediately if the dog is obtained past the age of 18 months.

With children, socialization from the time the dog is brought home is a must. True aggression towards babies and young children is rare and not characteristic of how the breed is meant to behave at all. In fact, this breed can be very tolerant of a child’s grabby hands and can be a very devoted fellow mischief maker to the young ones in his family.

The American Bulldog has a playful, impish streak when well-raised, well-bred, and well-rounded. Owners of this breed ideally will understand that this is a high-octane, powerful, headstrong breed and they shall be very careful to set limitations and rules for their dog and reinforce obedience training throughout the dog’s life.

Lifespan

Average lifespan of the American Bulldog is between 10 and 12 years.

See also  Bolognese Dog: Characteristics, Origin, Temperament & Lifespan

Feeding

How much a mature dog eats depends on it’s size, age, build, metabolism and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food.

The American Bulldog’s diet should be formulated for a large to giant breed, and their high energy level should be taken into consideration. And their needs will change from puppyhood to adulthood. Consult with your vet for better recommendation.

Caring

Taking good care is a must for raising American Bulldogs. Meeting their needs for exercise and mental stimulation is necessary. Failing to do so can result in anxiety, boredom and destructive behavior. So long as those needs are met, the rest is fairly standard.

Maintain normal vet visits, check their ears weekly, keep up with monthly nail clipping and normal dental care. One of the issues you may face is the potential for drooling that is common among bully breeds. You should take care to wipe your dog as needed unless you want a generous amount of slobber all over your home.

Health

The American Bulldogs are generally healthy. But like all other dog breeds, they are also prone to certain health conditions. Their common health problems include hip or elbow dysplasia, cataracts, mange, or hypothyroidism.

The breed is somewhat brachycephalic, meaning they have short snouts. This may make it more difficult for them to tolerate hot weather, especially while exercising. It is important to make sure they have enough water and monitor them and make sure they are not struggling to breathe. Keep good contact with a vet.

Breed Name American Bulldog
Other Names Country Bulldog, English White Bulldog, Hill Bulldog, Southern White, White English and Old Southern White Bulldog
Breed Size Large
Height 20 to 28 inches tall at the withers
Weight 27 to 54 kg
Good as pets Yes
Climate Tolerance All climates
Color Colors, while historically predominantly white with patches of red, black, or brindle, have grown in recent years to include many color patterns including black, red, brown, fawn, and all shades of brindle. The color conformation is quite varied, but solid black or any degree of merle is considered a cosmetic fault, and a blue color is a disqualification by the National Kennel Club Breed Standard
Lifespan 10 to 12 years
Good for children Yes
Rarity Common
Country of Origin United States