Is it cruel to crate a dog while at work

Dogs are social animals, they do require enough of attention and love. Always dogs expect us to be around. But not many of us can spend all day with our dogs, although it would be a great world if we could. We have work, school, family obligations, friends and other commitments in our lives.

Leaving Dog in crate while at work

Most dogs will need to be let out after 6- 8 hours. Puppies generally shorter time. To expect any dog to hold it for 12 hours is unrealistic.

If it’s not possible to get home at lunch or hire a dog walker,  crating a dog is not a great idea.  You will need a way to manage bathroom needs, such as an well-contained and sheltered outdoor area or well trained use of indoor litter box.

Once your dog is crate trained and house trained fully, you can leave the dog in a crate for up to 8 hours. The dog should have good exercise before and after, and should be left in the crate with something safe to occupy his attention. Stuff a Kong toy(compare on Amazon) with enough goodies to keep him busy for hours.

Fill a puzzle toy(compare on Amazon) with his daily ration of kibble(compare on Amazon)  so he has to work for his meals. Your dog will likely spend most of the time sleeping.

Crating all day is fine when necessary, for training or rehab

Yes,  it is cruel to crate a dog while at work – Considering Younger puppies

Younger puppies cannot be left in a crate for as long as 8 hours. Physically, puppies cannot hold their bladders long enough, and it isn’t fair to ask for that. A good general rule to follow is one hour in the crate for each month of age. A three-month-old puppy should be fine in the crate for three hours.

Puppies should sleep in their crates at night, as this helps them learn to sleep through the night. Place the crate directly beside your bed in early first training so that your puppy will not feel lonely and frightened, and can wake you easily in the middle of the night for a bathroom break.

Crating  for lifetime? consider alternatives

I’m here to share some tips on how you can make your dog’s life better — enrich it, as my behavior expert friends say — even when you’re not home

Make your Dog’s Life Better

Consider large x-pen

Dogs spend their time alone in a large x-pen (compare on Amazon). I wish I had dogs that could reliably be out in the house, but every time I have tried, they get into really BIG trouble eventually. The x-pen given them plenty of room, give them a friend to snuggle with and saves my house from destruction!

I used to crate my adult dogs during the day, until we had one with arthritis. She really suffered in the crate, but the x-pen was a very good solution. I just feel like it’s kinder to them.

Consider Crate for an injured dog

I have an injured dog so he’s crated except for hand walks to potty. That’s 24/7 for the next week. He crates well, and the crate offers him several options for support or lying flat out if he chooses.

X pen is not an option if you have big dogs

Crating ensures the dog is safe throughout the day and cannot get into trouble. X-pens (compare on Amazon) are great if you have smaller dogs but mine will jump a 5 ft fence from a standstill so something like that isn’t an option.

They LOVE their crates and go in them even when we are home because I leave the doors open for them. Most dogs sleep on their dog bed or on the couch when home alone so what’s the difference between that and a cozy crate? Obviously if the crate is not big enough that the dog cannot stand up and turn around in then it’s incorrectly sized, especially for a long day at work.

Most Mature Dog Owners recommend

If the crate is reasonably roomy, the dog isn’t a puppy, there are chew toys/bones (compare on Amazon) to work on, and when the people get home the dogs to go out for a real blow-off-steam outing and spends the rest of his time w/ his people, I don’t see a problem. My mature dogs spend a Lot of time sleeping, or lazily gnawing on something.

Refuse to crate train?

Many people refuse to crate or kennel-train their dogs because they feel the confinement is cruel. However, a crate or kennel can give dogs a sense of security. Crate training done properly is also a highly effective management system that can be a lifesaver for dog owners. Like any training method, crating can be abused, but using a crate for appropriate time periods is helpful with a variety of important goals, including house training, preventing destructive behavior, and teaching a dog to settle and relax.

Selecting Right Size Crate

Selecting the right size crate can be confusing. Some people are inclined to choose a large-sized crate to give the dog lots of room. If you pick a crate that is too large, your dog may use a portion of the crate as a toilet. Pick a crate that is just large enough for your dog to stand up, turn around, and lay down comfortably, at least until the dog is house trained.

 Most wire crates come with a divider (compare on Amazon) to block off a portion of the crate in order to make it smaller. With a plastic crate, place a box in the back half of the crate to make the space smaller. With these adjustment tricks, you do not have to buy multiple crates as your puppy grows. When your dog is toilet trained but not mature enough to be left loose in the house, feel free to go with a larger crate so the dog really has room to stretch out.

Being Home Alone is OK

First, teach your dog that being home alone is okay. Every dog should be able to stay on his own all day without falling apart emotionally or becoming destructive. From the time you first get him, whether he’s a puppy or an adult, practice leaving him alone.

Start with just a minute or two and gradually extend the length of time as you become comfortable with his behavior while you’re out of sight. He can be in his crate, in a special dog room or dog run or, once you’re sure he’s trustworthy, on his own in the house. Watch for potty accidents, too, as these will tell you how long your dog can be left without needing to go outside.

Anxiety Dog Crate

Make sure he has constructive ways to occupy his time when you’re not around.Stuff a Kong toy(compare on Amazon) with enough goodies to keep him busy for hours. Fill a puzzle toy(compare on Amazon) with his daily ration of kibble(compare on Amazon)  Hide treats or favorite toys around the house for him to find while you’re gone.

But a word of caution: Never leave your dog unsupervised with a toy that could be chewed apart and swallowed. Before leaving your dog alone, make sure any toys in the environment are indestructible.

Recommended Pet Supplies

Kong toy(compare on Amazon)

puzzle toy(compare on Amazon) 

kibble(compare on Amazon) 

chew toys/bones (compare on Amazon) 

X-pens (compare on Amazon)

Wire Crate with Divider(compare on Amazon)

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